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November 17, 2019

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5 Tips to Help You Get the Most Out of an Advising Session

October 13, 2017

 

1. Email your advisor in advance.

While your advisor may set up an appointment for you during freshman year, he/she probably won’t continue to create advising appointments for you in the future. Be prepared - check on KSIS to find out when your enrollment date is, and email your advisor or stop by their office in advance to set up an appointment.

 

2. Check your KSIS account for holds.

It’s a given that you’ll have at least one hold until you meet with an advisor and the enrollment flag is listed. However, you may have other holds if you have overdue library books, keys that need to be returned, or other tasks of that nature. The College of Ag requires an advising survey to be filled out before enrollment is possible as well.

 

3. Read and print your DARS report.

Found in KSIS under Student Center>Academics, your DARS report explains the graduation requirements for your degree option and displays both completed and unfulfilled requirements. It’s a good way to track your progress and will help you and your advisor make wise course selections, which helps ensure you will graduate on time. Many advisors require a copy of the DARS report at their sessions. Be prepared!

 

5. Have an idea of classes you’d like to take before you go to the advising appointment.

Along with the DARS report, take a look through the curriculum guide for your major and option. These are often available from your department’s office or on their page on the KSU website. Having some class options will help you end up in classes that you care about and that you have a personal interest in.

 

4. Prepare a few questions.

These don’t have to be in the fields of “major career choices” or “tell me what I’m doing with my life!” (although they can be). If you have questions about possible variances (substituting a different class for a curriculum requirement), ways to get more involved in your major or on campus, or questions about summer internships, don’t be afraid to ask them!

 

Although some of these tips may be more specific to the College of Ag, I hope you will find them helpful. Your advisor is there to help you succeed and wants you to do well and get involved!

 

In Sisterhood,

 

Chloe Shearon

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